Halkidiki Beaches, Greece: Where to Go and Where Not!

 
One of the Halkidiki beaches, Greece.

The Halkidiki Peninsula is “Poseidon’s trident” which consists of three smaller peninsulas: Kassandra, Sithonia, and Athos. They are about 100 km from the Thessaloniki airport. Athos is the place of religious tourism, Kassandra is suitable for non-poor young people and tourists with children, which means it can be noisy. We hypothesized that the Sithonia Peninsula would be the perfect choice for relaxing holidays. It was a mistake.

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Magical Estonian Maritime Museum, Seaplane Harbour

 

The Lembit submarine in the Estonian Maritime Museum, Tallinn.

The Lembit submarine in the Estonian Maritime Museum, Tallinn.

A museum must be a calm and sacred place. It must have many walls for numerous masterpieces: paintings, engravings, frescoes, mosaics…. It must have high ceilings to allow gigantic statues from ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, or Mesopotamia to be placed here and there. You cannot run or jump in a museum, and of course you cannot touch its exhibits. Moreover, in some museums, you are not even allowed to take photographs. Right? Not always!

Would you like to:

  • let your children run and jump in a museum (and even fly in a flight simulator)?
  • visit a real submarine made in 1936?
  • look at an antique submarine which had a hand engine?
  • sit in a real navy anti-aircraft gun and even control it?
  • go down to the engine room of a real icebreaker that broke ice in the Baltic Sea from 1914, and visit several navy ships nearby?
  • drink a little champagne in a café surrounded by the sound effects of an air attack before inspection of the museum exposition?

If so, you should visit the Seaplane Harbour (Estonian Maritime Museum) in Tallinn, Estonia.

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Pays Cathare or the Noble Ruins Remembering the Cathar Heresy

 

Chateaux de Lastours. Pays Cathare, Languedoc, France.

Chateaux de Lastours. Pays Cathare, Languedoc, France.

The whole land was filled with blood, castles were taken by storm, villages were lying in ruins, bonfires were blazing everywhere burning hundreds of people, the population was almost destroyed by the Crusader army led by Simon de Montfort hired by the pope. Did you think it happened somewhere in Palestine? No. It was Languedoc, France, which 800 years ago was named Occitania or Pays Cathare and belonged to the Cathars, people who dared to think about Jesus Christ in their own way, not according to the pope’s way. The head of the Catholic Church declared this doctrine to be the Cathar heresy and tested in Occitania a new method of getting rid of unwanted people—burning them at the stake—which would later became known as the Holy Inquisition.

Why burn people? Why not just kill them with well proven methods? Because their graves and memorial stones could remain and become places of worship for new heretics. Instead, nothing but ashes would be left after a fire. However, the pope was wrong. Memorial stones on the fields of mass burnings of Cathars in Languedoc were established, and today, we will stand near one of them at the foot of the famous ruins of the Cathar castle, Chateau de Montsegur.

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