Cactus Park on Ischia: A Piece of Arizona in Italy

Cactus Park, Ischia, Italy.

Cactus Park, Ischia, Italy.

You are an avid traveler. You can’t stay at home more than a month. Something very strong raises you from the easy chair and sends you to the next continent, country, city…. Traveling is your passion. But your other passion is gardening. You like to plant and to do your best to grow your wards to admire their flowers or fruits. How to connect these two passions? Is it possible at all? The answer is a cactus.

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Giotto’s Campanile, Lotte Tower, Burj Khalifa, or Why Aerial Views are So Magnificent

Did you ever fly in your sleep as a child? I did. Do you remember those bird’s-eye views of Earth? I do. Impressions were magnificent – I was a bird. Have you ever noticed that when someone is standing on the edge of something like the Grand Canyon and posing for a photographer, more often than not, they raise their arms to the sides? Why? Because in that moment, they feel they have wings. At least, they would in the fantastic world of dreams.

Panoramic view from the Castle of Monsanto, Portugal.
Panoramic view from the Castle of Monsanto, Portugal.

However, if you aren’t lucky enough to live in Norway’s fjords or the Swiss Alps, but still want to get similar impressions, mankind invented bell towers for you many centuries ago.

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Mausoleum of Hadrian Turned into Castel Sant’Angelo

Castel Sant'Angelo from the South by Caspar van Wittel. Oil on canvas.
Castel Sant’Angelo from the South by Caspar van Wittel. Oil on canvas.

When you are heading to the Vatican, you can’t avoid seeing an amazing ancient bridge (foot traffic only) decorated with angel sculptures, and a mighty, brown building of original architecture near it. The Castle of the Holy Angel in the center of Rome, Italy, started its history as a mausoleum of the Roman Emperor Hadrian in 139 AD. In 250 years, it became a castle when the young and rising power, the Christian Church, started to replace pagan Roman buildings with Christian ones.

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