Linderhof, Bavaria: Failed Versailles!

A cascade in Linderhof, Bavaria, Germany.

A cascade in Linderhof, Bavaria, Germany.

Who has not tried to replicate Versailles, the famous palace of Louis XIV, the king of France? Just look at Sanssouci, Peterhof, or Schoenbrunn to name a few. The young king of Bavaria, Ludwig II, also didn’t remain uninvolved. When he ascended the throne in 1864, at the age of 18, he immediately started to build his fairy tale castles and palaces. One of them, Linderhof, was supposed to be a new Versailles in the Bavarian Alps near the Linder River.

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Why We Adore Castle Ruins: Hohenfreyberg and Eisenberg, Germany

Castle ruins of Eisenberg, Germany.

Ruins of the castle of Eisenberg, Germany.

It seems that some of us prefer ruins to whatever these ruins were before the deterioration: castle, estate, or palace. Why? Is not it better to admire the decorated ceilings of the Vatican; the interiors of Versailles, France; or the marble floors of St. John’s Co-Cathedral, Malta? Undoubtedly. But just imagine what our descendants will see in these places, if they find them in ruins (heaven forbid) as we found ruins of temples in Angkor, Cambodia, Cathar castles on the rocks of Languedoc, France, or the heroes of today’s story, the castle ruins of Hohenfreyberg and Eisenberg in Bavaria, Germany.

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The Emerald River of Lech in Fuessen, Bavaria

The river of Lech, Fuessen, Bavaria, Germany.

The river of Lech, Fuessen, Bavaria, Germany.

Every morning, an old Bavarian wakes up in his tiny, but comfortable flat near St. Mang’s Abbey in the old part of Fuessen, Bavaria. He drinks a strong black coffee that he always buys in Montenegro during summer vacations. Unfortunately, his beautiful Bavaria doesn’t have good coffee. Then he goes to stroll along his favorite river, the emerald river of Lech, a wonder of Fuessen. Why emerald? Because its water is emerald green.

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