Athens Archaeological Museum: Pearl among Havos

Athens is the city of great goodness, which causes many associations at the heart of every antique history admirer.

The Goddess Athena

The Goddess Athena

It is the city, the state which scheduled the development path of all European civilization for many centuries forward. A great number of things, without which we can’t imagine our modern life, appeared exactly here first.

But Athens today is shabby, stagy and alarming city with empty eyes of dark windows and nailed-up doors, splattered with graffiti and overcrowded with “fair-faced” immigrants. Poverty and decadence are everywhere in spite of all efforts to dolly it up and decorate. Though, Athens is worth to be visited, one-time at least, to look…

not even at Parthenon, which still looks proudly at this messy bazaar around it.

The Turks made here ammunition store (!!) hoping, that Venetians will not shoot. But they did it!

 The Parthenon of Athens

The Parthenon of Athens

The British took out to the British Museum almost every piece. The Greeks require their heritage back – like, they were robbed!… But may be, you were rescued? You couldn’t even find your Holy City Delphi (did you try, at least?), as long as the French did it…

And even not for the super-theatre, which is old, gray and magnificent, as a wise monk. What a lot of fates it looked on…

Acropolis of Athens

… and not even for the tiny pieces of sites which meet around the city – terms, libraries, halls, water pipes – archaeological museum under the open sky.

Athens, Greece

Athens, Greece

… and not even for the powerful remains of the Temple of Zeus Olympic, – one’s jaw dropped when coming there. Only these two columns are enough to understand: it was great CIVILAZATION, … but not today.

Athens, Greece

A stock of vulgar tiny houses gang around and rabbit together, it crowds, yelping, – it wants to get a territory, but scared.

Athens, Greece

Athens, Greece

… and not even for terrible ballet, which is performed by forced comedians against the walls of the Royal Palace. Oh, Jeez, what mushrooms does the producer of this show take?!

One should at any cost look at Athens Archaeological Museum and Binaki Gallery.

The Greeks were finally managed to save some evidences of their former majesty and we are very grateful for this. It is required to spend at least one day at the Archaeological Museum. You should walk there slowly, enjoy and be inspired with OUR common history. Do you think piggy-bank was invented nowadays? It sounds like false. It was invented more than four thousand years ago!

Athens Archaeological Museum

What about frying pan? Do you think it is modern thing? Here it is.

Athens Archaeological Museum

The collection of various vases, amphorae and vessels in museum is just admirable. And not only because of its amount, but mostly because of skills and fantasy. The amateur or the student of fictile art which is considered to be rather honored profession erst should spend there more than one day.

Athens Archaeological Museum

Athens Archaeological Museum

Athens Archaeological Museum

Athens Archaeological Museum

Athens Archaeological Museum

In this stage one has a sudden feeling of approaching to the Pearl of all museum.

Athens Archaeological Museum

It seems that it was placed like this intentionally. In order not to appeared here from round the corner, but beginning slowly realize, that you are becoming closer to the shadow-figure, which is unspeakably familiar … since childhood. What is this in it? Nothing special. It is one of great number of antique statues … but the talent makes any work the way it becomes the masterpiece, even if there is no any features of it. This is a real masterpiece!

Bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, Athens Archaeological Museum

Bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon. ca. 460 BC

Bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon in Athens Archaeological Museum

Bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon in Athens Archaeological Museum

You can visit unfortunate Athens only with one purpose – to see this statute.

Athens Archaeological Museum

And what about memorial headstones? It does not give any cue on death.

In Athens Archaeological Museum

Classical Greek sculpture in Athens Archaeological Museum

Work in bronze. Have you ever seen modern monuments? Let’s make a comparison. Don’t you think that for 4 000 years we have not been drawn out, but took a step back, especially concerning this skill, at least?

Bronze sculpture in Athens Archaeological Museum

One probably can speak about Classical Greek sculpture for hours…

Stay tuned…

More about Greece:
Santorini and the Theory of Atlantis
My 300 Spartans History
Whether Antinous and Emperor Hadrian Were Lovers? What a Primitive Version!

Posted in Greece. Tags: . 30 Comments »

30 Responses to “Athens Archaeological Museum: Pearl among Havos”

  1. RenaTaylor Says:

    Magnificamente! )

    Like

  2. Glamorholic Says:

    Really amazing pictures. Do you speak italian? :)) (I saw the upper comment)

    Like

  3. krismerino Says:

    Absolutely love this. What wonderful photos. Thanks for sharing this!

    Like

  4. Victor Tribunsky Says:

    There are so many wonderfull places in the world. Wish You lucky travels.

    Like

  5. travelinglitely Says:

    You have seen some magnificent things. Your photos are beautiful! — Susie C.

    Like

  6. Moonmooring Says:

    I spent 3 weeks in Greece several years ago and got many amazing photos. This is a beautiful shot of the Parthenon.

    Like

  7. frigginloon Says:

    Wonderful pics. So you recommend going to Greece for the Poseidon adventure?. Please tell me the food was OK??

    Like

  8. Becoming Madame Says:

    I spent the month of June in Greece this year. Truly wonderful experience. You’ve taken some fabulous photos. Thanks for the stroll back through a great holiday.

    Like

  9. Oscar Says:

    I have not gotten to Greece, but have it on the wish list. I have seen the Parthenon statues in the British Museum (several times). You have pointed out well the ambivalence that I feel toward museums of antiquities. I rejoice that they have been preserved, but ponder the effect of removing them from their correct location. On the other hand, I have seen many “ruins” of temples, etc. surrounded by modern structures. What happened to all the cities, towns, and villages which used to surround those temples? Thanks for the contemplation.

    Like

  10. The World is My Cuttlefish Says:

    Extraordinary riches in this city. I loved it. Great to relive it through your excellent pictures.

    Like

  11. Pommi Says:

    Hi Victor,

    I have nominated you for the Versatile Blogger Award. I like your blog…keep travelling, Keep writing…

    http://intherainandsun.wordpress.com/2011/12/02/the-versatile-blogger-award/

    -Pommi

    Like

  12. hereandthere40_Lucas Rokosz Says:

    Hahah, oh man, the poor greeks have taken a beating their whole life. Even today the continue to, in your blog, and economically…. hahah

    Like

  13. benbinbenben Says:

    it’s not true to say that the acropolis marbles were stole, certainly they should be returned, but they were not robbed. prior to removal most marble antiquities were being burned to produce lime, or included in new buildings,. elgin originally had planned just to make casts, but got carried away and using his own money he in his mind saved the marbles, and sold them for public display to the british government for less than he had spent to save them,
    just a note.
    thanks for your like earlier, i enjoyed your blog also.

    Like

  14. ryesandshine Says:

    Your photos are stunning. They took me right back to Greece!

    Like

  15. artdone Says:

    I thought that ‘The British took out to the British Museum almost every piece’ from the Parthenon frieze too!
    But it’s not true 😉
    They took a lot but there’s still a lot to see in Athens (now in new Akropolis Museum), and some parts are in other museum like Louvre or Vatican.
    Great post, nice pics! Thanx

    Like


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